Skip to main content

About your Search

20121202
20121210
STATION
MSNBCW 9
CSPAN2 8
CNNW 5
MSNBC 3
CSPAN 1
KPIX (CBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 45
Search Results 0 to 44 of about 45 (some duplicates have been removed)
-abiding citizens. if he suggested stripping civil rights fromfully any other grimes large or small -- if you said black americans shouldn't be allowed to vote. you would be disciplined or fired tomorrow or later on this afternoon. it's an outrageous thinger to him to do. he's wrong that guns don't enhance safety. fbi's estimate is 750,000 times a year, 2,000 times a day law abiding citizens pull out a pistol and stop themselves from becoming a victim of crime. costas doesn't know what he's talking about. he suggested stripping me and millions of americans of our civil rights. >> there are so many things wrong with what he just said. he shouldn't be fired for expression an opinion. the idea that we live in a society that we can't express an opinion because of people's sensibility. and i never heard a rant. i just heard a person giving his opinion which i think is acceptable. bob costas has been around a long time. he's very respected. the idea that he would be fired over expressing an opinion over a tragedy is shocking. i'm not an anti-gun person. i group with guns. i group alaska. my taught for w
holdouts of an era when democrats dominated texas politics. brooks supported civil rights and refused to sign the segregation southern manifesto in 1956 and went on to right the civil rights act of 1964. wasn't my daughter's black bean soup spectacular? [ man thinking ] oh, this gas. those antacids aren't working. oh no, not that, not here! [ male announcer ] antacids don't relieve gas. gas-x is designed to relieve gas. gas-x. the gas xperts. >>> and which political story will make head leans in 24 hours contributor and manager editor, chris cizzilis rejoins us. when do you think they get down to seriously talking and you keep hearing that there's some optimism here of people who are really smart players. it's hard to find the signs of it. >> well, andrea, i would predict they won't in 24 hours. look. i do think -- i think the reason for optimism that you hear is because people don't believe politicians will willingly put themselves in a situation of tremendous uncertainty. that is, going over the cliff. no one knows what would happen. we all think, oh, there's economists saying it wo
, and in some states it increased, like ohio. some civil rights leaders say it was those attempts at voter suppression that drove voters out to vote even if it meant standing in line for hours. what is clear is the republican party has a deeper problem right now. it's failing to attract minority voters largely due to the policies and the rhetoric some of its leaders and their cronies have been using. what's going on? what can the republican party do about it? big questions. j.c. watts, former u.s. congressman from oklahoma. and judith browne dianis. thank you so much. let me ask judith to start with some homework that we couldn't do but we're counting on to you do. people come up to me and said, i was so angry about some of the suppression talk and attempts in those 30-some states. african-americans would say i got out there and i voted. what evidence do you have that it really worked in favor, or rather put it this way, against the republicans for trying to do that? >> well, number one, we know that they tried to do it so that they could have partisan advantage, but we do know it backfire
the international covenant of civil and political rights on express understanding that he was not self-executing. so it did not create applications enforceable in the federal court. the supreme court in the united states has told at the very standard applied in this treaty that is not self-executing means nobody has access to any quarter. there is no enforceable right to get anybody in america create in this treaty. the mac to enter the senator, i'm not aware of the specific british request and what response they drew. i would only say this. it's important, mr. president to understand whether distemper senator from massachusetts and i differ on most of these treaties, with the same disagreement on the law of the sea treaty. the question is in my opinion is their sovereignty of believe infringed upon our sovereignty and with that i yield the floor. >> mr. president, i yield five minutes. to the senator from illinois. >> by methinks senator kerry, senator mccain, senator lugar and so many others who have put this matter to the floor. it was 22 years ago when a historic event took place on the fourth u
that people make. >> we've come a long way baby, and i still remember just before the civil rights movement when racists and masog masogyists. whatever happened to content of character not color of skin, you can't criticize susan race because she's black and female, what are the rules. >> jon: and we thought we'd play it clip for you from the msnbc anchor. >> mccain tried to make her unnominatable, and would look weak. and mccain inappropriate political attack and gave us the horrible optics of he and lindsey graham as old white establishment folks wrongly and repeatedly attacking a younger black women and moments when they went strongly blue. >> jon: and claims that mccain went on a witch hunt and tarring the ambassador in the press. that's quite a loaded word. >> so many words that he can say that for some reason i can't say. next time we hear the usual suspects in the review and denouncing rush limbo, remember, they were stone cold silent most likely so far on all of this race baiting going on on the rice-mccain issue. >> jon: what about the real issues what are the real issues that the
countries should aspire. it's kind of flattering. our civil rights advance, one that was hard fought, but one. so far this treaty has been signed by 154 countries including the u.s. it's been ratified by 126 nations, not including the u.s. president obama, in other words, signed it a couple years ago, but it's not been ratified by the united states senate. to be clear, this treaty would not require anything from us at all. we already have disability rights. it just pushes other countries to do what we have done. we would commit on an international level to what we already believe in here. ratifying that treaty would help us lead the rest of the world to catch up to that historic leap that we took as a country when president bush signed that legislation. with the exception of a black helicopter conspiracy theory on the right championed by failed senator rick santorum, he, who i should mention is a columnist at a birther website, that's his job now, except for his nutso theories ratifying this treaty was a political no brainer. it has bipartisan support. this has the real thing. real b
as a voice for civil liberties and civil rights. you have both bush signing it, drafting it, and then it is astonishing that these nativist voices, the fear of the united nations this paranoid sensibility that captures a few votes in the republican party prevent it from passing the senate that is supposed to be a batian of reason. you worked in the obama white house, does it shock you when lindsey graham stands up and votes against this. he's somewhat a respected member of the senate. >> nothing shocks me any more. the republican party has been moving away from disability for some time. when you look at other things that the congress has focused on medicaid, healthcare, the affordable care act, even looking at what's going on with the fiscal cliff right? are we going to balance our budget by lessoning lessening the support to those with disability or focus on those at the top 1%. this trend is ongoing and i hope it doesn't continue. the bipartisan tradition around disability is longstanding, and i think it's mourn. it's one of those few issues that traditionally both republi
broadly where are we head with civil rights and equality. if the supreme court strikes down the defensive marriage act and strikes down the ban in california on same sex couples marriages it will mean we move to a more equal place. if it reaches a different conclusion we'll see what happens. >> what are the arguments. >> the argument against marriage rights for same sex couples is generally that marriage historically traditionally has been something limited to different sex couples. the supreme court has found in a long time held tradition alone is not enough to justify discrimination. on the other side the real point is marriage when we're talking about marriage recognized by the state as opposed toby a church or synagogue or religious institution, marriage by the state is about a civil right. in those cases government discrimination shouldn't be coming into play. >> do we know at this point -- do we have any sense how the supreme court might line up on this? >> it's hard to say. my view is despite what a lot of people seem to say this is increasingly
the transition only under that coercion and duress. >> i think you are exactly right. this is an example of radical social change that happens under top-down pressure. sometimes it happens by movements like civil rights moment or right to vote for women in this country and sometimes it has to come from topdown change. when that topdown change is perceived to be efficiently enforced, then the exploiter has to adapt. what you see with forms of slavery today there are laws, there are penalties. by in large they are not perceived to be effectively active and enforced so the exploiter does not have to adapt too much or adapt just enough to avoid identification. >> thank you for a stimulating presentation. i want to get your reaction to the idea in general terms that maybe the diagnosis is only as good as the remedy it prescribes. in a particular way of asking that question, i would like to hear you say what your study on the shrimp supply chain suggests about an appropriate remedy for the exploitation that we're seeing there. and secondly, in more conceptual terms, all related to remedies. if
that have no beliefs in civil liberties, countries who are terrible on human rights and we say we're going to put you in charge of decisions -- >> that's not what it does. it forces them to live up to standards that we believe in. >> no, it doesn't. where does it say in there the other countries will live up to our standards. >> that's what the treaty does. it seds down standards. >> it does not say -- >> john, happy holidays. bob shrum -- >> giving away all our power. >> sometimes it comes down to how we look at the world. republicans made no secret to keep democrats from voting. is it possible those voter i.d. laws, the photo i.d. laws, actually encouraged african-americans among others to defy the gop and go out and vote. i kneel happened. i have heard that happened. let's hear about it. did it happen? did blacks and others say screw you, you're not going to stop me the from voting. let's find out how it worked. we'll be right back. bp has paid over twenty-three billion dollars to help those affected and to cover cleanup costs. today, the beaches and gulf are open, and many areas are re
's life is threatened by this legislation. joining him is fellow civil rights carrie kennedy. the center awarded frank for his efforts in uganda. good to have you here. you've been fighting this bill for years. david cato who is a friend of yours, recently killed in uganda for his work against fighting this bill. you've taken over his work. but are you basically handing yourself a death sentence by being on a program like this putting yourself in a line of fire? >> yes. i've been fighting this legislation for a long time now and if this legislation is passed into law, i will definitely be put life in prison or life -- or sentenced to death. and right knew, i'm here in new york with the human rights and have been providing a lot of support in trying to stop this legislation. the speaker says she wants to pass it as a christmas gift for ugandans. >> it is the pipeline, moved through a certain lower form of government there working up for a vote within parliament. carrie, why does the rfk center want to highlight a sister like frank and what is taking place in uganda? in america we're celeb
was known for being one of the first supporters of civil rights. he died in beaumont after a sudden illness. he was widely known for this photograph standing behind president johnson as he's being sworn in aboard air force one in 1963. brooks was also in the dallas motorcade when jfk was shot. >>> president obama's chief speechwriter might be leaving. "the washington post" reports john favro is not clear if he'll write the president's inaugural address first. >>> where is jan brewer? she notified her office she'd be gone for a week but didn't say where she'd be going. her staff says it is official business. >>> two big milestones for women, congressman nita lowie will be the ranking democrat, making her the highest in that ki committee's history and elizabeth warren is expected to be named to the senate banking committee. according to the "wall street journal" it could be a signal from the democrats to wall street to watch out. >>> we're barely out of the november 2012 elections and there's talk what big names you could see in the ballot box ahead. richard lui is here with that. >> that's t
that every, kind of a civil right. every worker should have that right in my opinion. bill: you're of the free economics mind anyway. >> that's true. bill: you will argue this will help michigan's economy, in a word you're saying yes? >> definitely. bill: matt, what do you think impact of the law could be? >> if you look at numbers, bill, steve hit it right on the head. 2001 to 2011, look at right to work states. inflation adjusted compensation rose private sector employees 12%, versus nonright to work states only increased by 3%. what happens when you make more money you increase the amount of people that want to move to your state. in that same time frame again, look at right to work states, saw the population from 25 to 34 increase 11.3%. in nonright to work states, increase .6. what all the numbers mean, more people move to your state, more tax revenue, more jobs, more companies coming there. if you put it together it is great for the local economy. bill: here are some more numbers and these are staggering, guys. unemployment in michigan is 9%. you know, across the country,
was not willing. what she is doing and i will say this because it needs to be said, i came out of the civil right movement and i was involved in the election of the first black mayors across america, chicago, philadelphia, atlanta, a lost places. for the congressional democrats to go out there and to attack her as racist and an attack on women, when are we going to reach a place in politics when where you lie, which she did, and you screw up, you are held accountable regardless of race and gender. this is, this victimization stuff is backfiring i am afraid and it is all the cards she think she has and she is running the meeting and was arrogant. >> it comes from the top down, since the president was re-elected, we saw the thing we talked about in the first segment with him trying to take the power away to raise the debt debt. that is unbelievable. and i think he things he can have anyone he wants and stick it down the senator's throats. >>gregg: do you think he will nominate her? >> i don't think he can. he will have to go of necessity, to john kerry who the republicans will confirm in a second a
historic laws including the civil rights act of 1964. what a life. jack brooks, dead at 89. bill: 25 minutes past the hour. there could soon be a major shortage of primary care doctors. the journal of the medical american association says 22% of internal medicine residents are planning to become internal medicine doctors. what does this mean to you? marc siegl joins us now with the latest on this. doctor, nice to see you. >> good to see you. bill: what does it mean. >> i want to explain to our views out there exactly what an internal medicine doctor is. we always talk about primary care. primary care is a pediatrician, obstetrician, gynecologist for women's health, family practitioner or a general internist, which is what i am. someone who does the internal organs of the pwaopbd say body and says i'm not going to become a lung specialist, i'm going to stay as a general doctor. you're sick, you're having high blood pressure, high cholesterol, i'm the guy you see. people need doctors like that. without doctors like that what are we going to do? there was another study two years ago, th
compliance with the legislation. laws such as the civil rights rs act, title 9, the family leave act strengthen our position. most importantly, i'm reminded of the veterans who have returned from the wars in iraq and afghanistan. the brave veterans who have served in all the places we have asked them to go, who have advanced the interests and ideals of the united states. we owe them a debt for their service. many of them have returned with severe wounds, some requiring lifetime care. and i'd like to just read a statement from one of the veterans that appeared in front of the foreign relations committee, a disabled attorney and veteran -- marine veteran john lancaster. and this is what he said. and i quote here. "in 1968 i arrived in vietnam in the tet ow offensive as an infay platoon commander. five months later i was shot and injured in a fire fight. after months of rehas been takers i arrived back home in western new york a disabled veteran. although my friends and family welcomed me home, society did not receive me quite as we will. while there is certainly tension around the poli
that many church-goers have changed their views about gay civil rights is one of the most underreported reasons why same-sex marriage is now legal in nine states. it is also one of the reasons that the constitution of prop 8 which took away gay californians right to marry. may get a hearing. the announcement was to be today. probably friday. a majority of main line protestants and roman catholics now favor legalizing same-sex marriage. did you know that? i knew a majority of americans. i did not know a majority of protestants and catholics favor marriage equality. >> that's awesome. >> stephanie: i was quite interested. >> thank you. >> stephanie: so when other more conservative christian kin claim it is against the bible we beg to differ. they wrote this in the "l.a. times," we posted this up on steph stephanie miller facebook. there are only three passages that deal with homosexuality in the new testament. the passages don't deal with homosexuality but with temple prostitution and other abuses. i'm
with disabilities act, and what it has done to our society. like our civil rights act. what it's done to break down the barriers and to show that people with disabilities can contribute to society, if only given the chance and the opportunity. i would think that we would want for them to then say yes, we'll be a part of a worldwide effort to break down those barriers against people with disabilities we want be part of a worldwide effort that says it's not right, it's not okay, to leave a baby on the side of the road to die simply because that baby has down syndrome. you would think we would want to be part of an effort, a global effort that says it's not all right to keep kids out of school and away from education because they have a physical disability, they use a wheelchair. or an intellectual disability. you would think we would want to be part of an effort like that that says it is not okay to put people in cells, chained to cells, whose only crime is that they are disabled. you would think we would want to be part of that effort. we've done that in this country. we've done wonderful things. an
the leadership conference on civil and human rights, the wounded warrior project, the hindu american foundation the islamic center of -- society of north america, the jewish federations of america, the national catholic social justice lobby, and the veterans of foreign wars. let me share a couple of letters. bernard from franklin county in my state wrote, "i'm concerned about recent grumblings about former senator santorum and others. i was a lot of regard for the a.d.a. and a a wareness of discrimination against people with disabilities. when will the senate take up this u.n. resolution? what can i do to convince oppositional senators that this is an important and necessary resolution for people with disabilities, especially our nation's veterans? well, bernard, my colleagues on the other side of the aisle -- nor mccain, former majority leader bob dole, both of whom served our country honorably in the armed forces, and 21 veterans organizations agree with you. this should be an opportunity for all americans to come together and show the world we're committed to ensuring the basic human dignity
oversight activities. these why you have this civil contempt action in federal court right now. that's on going. you also have the chief of staff -- bill: give me a sense of what is in the documents that would tell you or us what happened? >> well, what we have to find out is exact why the department of justice in february issued a letter saying there was no gun walking at all, whatsoever, no such activity took place, and eight months later they revoked that letter and said, we made a mistake that is not true. bill, if you were called to testify before a senate panel or i was and we submitted false statements in february we don't get to say sorry we made a mistake and withdraw them eight months later you would be facing criminal sanctions. the reality is the documents are necessary to find out what was going on and if there is a cover up here why, now you do have the chief of staff for the department of justice has resigned as of friday of this week. he gave his notice in, and as congressman darrell issa said that was long over do. i concur with the congressman. this is the beginning
, the question is, could you do something to shorten this brutal, dirty civil war or are you going to do nothing or continue along the path that you are right now and have a long, extended war? >> and if we are waiting for russia to come around and pave the way to a u.n. resolution similar to that in the case of libya, do you think that that waiting will pay off? >> i don't think so. it's hard to imagine russia at this point, anyway, from my vantage point. maybe i have been proved wrong. approving of a u.n. resolution. even in the latest talks that secretary of state hillary clinton has had with the russian foreign minister, it's not like everybody is on the same page. they're not. obviously, the russians are looking at this very closely because they can see their client busard is in a very tricky situation and do they want to be on the losing side? on the same token, with the u.s. not really being involved has not really many friends on the ground in syria. what happens if bashar falls? who do you talk to and have relations with on the ground? i know they have come up with this coalition, this
: right now new violence in syria's civil war. state media there saying 29 students and a teacher were killed when a mortar slammed into a school outside damascus. and we have this. new amateur video said to be showing a government warplane on a bombing run over a damascus suburb. it is home to many rebels and their supporters. we can not confirm the authenticity of that video but we have no reasondoubt it e. conor powell live from jerusalem. >> reporter: jon, it appears the war in syria is entering a new phase. in recent days and weeks the syrian government faced a real military setback as rebels begin to advance towards damascus. that is one of the reason we've seen intense fighting around damascus and more and more of the syrian jets making bombing runs trying to attack the syrian opposition groups. the fear if the syrian government, the assad regime feels their grip is beginning to loosen and slip away that they will turn to chemical weapons. there is evidence according to u.s. around national intelligence officials say that the assad regime is beginning to prepare their chemical a
's liberal constitutionalism. it's these documents. it's civil society. egypt seems to be going in the direction of not liberal democracy but illiberal democracy. >> right. you're absolutely right that people who are worried about egypt right now absolutely see it going in this illiberal direction. the constitution guarantees some individual rights, has great language about individual rights, but it makes it all subject to the sharia or principles of the sharia. >> the state is given charge of public morality. a loose open ended term. >> absolutely. women's rights, for example which there's been a constitutional article that said the state will work to achieve equality between men and women. as long as it doesn't violate principles of the sharia. that was in the constitution. now it's gone. now there's a nondiscrimination clause, but it doesn't mention women as a protected class. it is a step backwards in terms of liberties. if you believe what we care about when we look at democracy, we don't just care about the voting, it is important, we care about freedom and liberty for peo
should look at my organization. usip data private study. right now u.s. policy, also civil society and others were sitting on the sidelines here or there was a desire among local forces including younger islamists who want to bring about changes in their political movement in for the large purse sitting on the sidelines here we need to do more. >> we need to move on to the q&a portion here. a few questions from the audience. if you have a question, research and peer to microphone circulating. 10 minutes before we begin to wrap a. >> my name is -- [inaudible] -- washington d.c. what's missing on discussions is the fact that islamists have nothing to offer except for sharia law and muslims are fed up with the sharia law. the other point is there's a new new generation of arabs that face the people. i wrote an article about this, who are very different than their fathers and grandfathers. which we should be focusing on. >> can make it to a question? >> -- something we should be focusing on. our democracy by islamist ideology. what shall we do about the threat to democracy the case ara
." share "you owe me..." share "just right." the share everything plan. sharable data across 10 devices with unlimited talk and text. get a droid razr m by motorola for $49.99. the bloody civil war in sir i wouldn't took a por more ominous turn with the assad regime might use chemical weapons against rebel forces. joining us, embassador michael oren. there's a report in the sunday times of london that israel has spotters on the ground in syria. what is your latest intelligence about assad preparing possibly getting ready to use chemical weapons. is he still mixing the gas we saw signs of this week or have the warnings from the president and secretary of state hillary clinton scared him off? >> we're watching the situation carefully. it's not new to us, syria has a varied, deep chemical weapons program, geographically dispersed. were the weapons to pass into the wrong hands that would be a game-changer. >> at this point any signs as to whether he's continuing to mix the gas or whether he pulled back? >> i can't confirm those reports but i can say we're watching it and we have a very clea
to shorten this brutal, dirty civil war, or are you going to do nothing or continue along the path that you are right now and have a long, extended war? >> and if we are waiting on russia to come around and pave the way, similar to that in the case of libya, do you think that will pay off? >> i don't think so. it's hard to imagine russia at this point anyway, from my vantage point, maybe i'll be proved wrn ed wrong, approving u.n. resolution. even in the latest talks that hillary clinton has had, it's not like it's suddenly kumbaya and everybody's on the same page. they're not. obviously the russians are la looking at this very closely because they can tell that their client, assad, is in a very tricky situation. but by the very same token, the u.s. without being involved now really has not many friends on the ground in syria. so what happens if assad somehow falls? who do you then talk to? who do you then have relations with on the ground? i know they've come up with a coalition, this opposition coalition. but that too has yet to fully prove itself as an effective and consolidated oppositi
, that the magnitsky act remain focused scairl and exclusively on russia. that's what russian democrats and civil society groups tell me they want right now. they want congress to send their government a message on human rights and by keeping the magnitsky act focused for now on russia we can do just that. furthermore, the administration can use its own executive authority at this time to apply similar kinds of pressures contained in the magnitsky act to human rights abusers in other countries. i for one will be watching closely to see if they do. for in many other cases are crying out for greater u.s. leadership on behalf of human rights. and if the administration does not take the initiative to apply the leverage at our disposal to these other cases beyond russia, that is the surest way to ensure that the congress will act to globalize the enact next year. there are still many people who look at the magnitsky act as anti--russia. i disagree. i believe it's pro-russia. believe it's pro-russia because this legislation is about the rule of law, and human rights, and accountability which are values
of the assad regime. he thinks he can get away with it. he believes he's lost anyway because the civil war engulfed his regime and the rebels have been on the march the last several months. >> we'll be right back with red light cameras. are they legal? citracal slow release continuously releases calcium plus d with efficient absorption in one daily dose. citracal slow release. ♪ [ male announcer ] campbell's green bean casserole. it's amazing what soup can do megyn: a major class action lawsuit over red light cameras. this new lawsuit alleges cameras are actually rigged to booths payoff for the ticket collectors. trace gallagher has more on that. >> reporter: it's a cash cow for new york city. $293 million in the past five years alone. the reason new york is being sued is the drivers think the i is rigging them. federal law says the yellow lights at intersections where the speed olympic is 30-mile-an-hour has to be at least 3 seconds long. trim a seth sent out to engineers. they checked out a dozen lights and found all of the yellow lights were too short. some of them up to a half second
to the hospital. we are live at the breaking news desk. the new nears about chemical weapons in the civil war rocking syria, why the u.s. and the international community should be concerned. we'll go in-depth with ambassador bolton. jenna: right now we are learning about a serious health problem for a former child star, rick folbaum is live at the breaking news news desk with more. >> reporter: you don't usually hear about healthy 20 somethings having strokes. that's what doctors say happened to frankly m u.n. is. he was riding his motorcycle in phoenix when he lost vision in one eye. friends, including his fiancee got worried when he was acting very strangely. turns out he was having a mini stroke. here he is on "good morning america." >> something wasn't right. i knew i did not feel right. coy -pbt say words. couldn't say words. i thought i was saying them. my fiancee was looking at me like i was speaking a foreign language. maybe i had a bad headache, i don't know. i've never had a sip of alcohol in my life, i've never had any drugs, i've never even smoked a cigarette. i can't get a deep b
to this decendant of that legendary civilization. olympia is a true leader who has always devoted her considerable intellect, energy and commitment to doing what was right for maine and for america. olympia snowe has dedicated her life to public service. 18 years in the united states senate preceded by 16 representing maine's second congressional district, plus 5 in the maine legislature add up to a remarkable record of commitment to our nation and the great state of maine. but that span of nearly four decades tells us only part of the story. for olympia has truly set the gold standard for public service. from the statehouse to the u.s. capitol, olympia has built an outstanding reputation as an informed, thoughtful and effective legislator. she can always be counted on as a leader with integrity who pursued solutions and who had no interest in just scoring partisan political points. it is olympia's character that has made all that difference. mr. president, the private acts of public figures can tell you a lot about their character, so i want to share with my colleagues this morning a story about
the civil society organizations and others were standing on the side lines here. they have to do private city along the same line. right now i think the u.s. policy, and again, u.s. government policy that those of you i think in the civil society and others were sitting on the sidelines here where there's a desire among the political forces including the under islamists who want to bring about change in their political movement and were for the large part sitting on the side line here and we need to do more. >> we do need to move on to the q&a portion here. i would like to take a few questions from the audience the if you have a question raise your hand. we have migrants' circulating and we will take ten minutes before we begin to wrap up. >> i'm on the center for democracy and human rights in saudi arabia in washington, d.c. what's missing over on these discussions which i tend to miss them less and less is the fact that islamists haven't been told all along. the other point is there is a new generation who are very different than their fathers and grandfathers. what we should be focusi
syndrome. 45 minutes after the hour. right back on "the stephanie miller show." >> oh, my! how ruthlessly absurd! >> announcer: it's "the stephanie miller show." exciting issue. from financial regulation, iran getting a nuclear bomb, civil war in syria, fraud on wall let's rock and roll. there is so much going on that every day presents another exciting issue. from financial regulation, iran getting a nuclear bomb, civil war in syria, fraud on wall street, destruction of medicare and medicaid. there are real issues here. having been a governor, i know that trade-offs are tough. things everyday exploding around the world that leave no shortage for exciting conversations. i want our viewer to understand why things have happened. at the end of the show, you know what has happened, why its happened and more importantly, what's going to happen tomorrow. get irresistibly clean and fresh carpets in your home with resolve deep clean powder. the moist powder removes three times more dirt than vacuuming alone while neutralizing odors for a clean you can see, smell and really enj
right, jill. thanks so much. jill dougherty there in brussels with the secretary. now, we are seeing new evidence today, meanwhile, of how turkey is being drawn into the civil war in neighboring syria or the potential. have a look at this. that's the view a little earlier from the turkish side of the border, as syrian war planes bombed not for the first time, the town that is literally just across the border that separates the two countries. ivan watson joining us now from istanbul, turkey. i know you have been there, and that attack obviously panicking civilians, many of whom have been crossing back and forth across the border. tell us what you have heard. >> that's right. our witnesses describing to us how the air strikes, at least two bombs dropped by syrian jets on this border town. it sent women, children, screaming in panic to the train tracks and the barbed wire fence that divides this border town in syria from the turkish town that's just about 100 yards away. it's really close and, of course, frightening people inside turkey as well. opposition activists we talked to say at leas
been critical to getting the word out. video like the one posted on-line. this one right here. shows peaceful demonstrations against president bashir aul awes yad that began last year and spiralled into now what is happening. >> activists regularly posting these videos and articles about the civil war that is taking place there. often these are really just only the images we are able to get from the front lines wrush see it there. she is co-founder and managing editor of syrian deeply.org. you're a former correspondent with abc and bloomberg as well. you have seen some of the -- what is taking place there. what do you make of the civil war? >> my heart breaks like the ones in arwa's piece. what we felt we had to do was to step out of the story for a moment and just look at technology, look at what's coming out from user-generated images, from voices of syrians trying to tell their stories and just collect it in one place, so we decided to build syria deeply. it's part news aggregator, part backgrounder and part original reporting. what we felt we needed do was to give people more bac
Search Results 0 to 44 of about 45 (some duplicates have been removed)